Issue 133

A Mother and Daughter, Serving Mothers and Babies The Story of a Mother-Daughter Team of Placenta Encapsulators

Not many mothers and daughters have the privilege of sharing a work life in addition to a family life. When they do, it’s not usually in such a unique professional niche as placenta encapsulation. For the past five years, my mom, Ruth Ripple, and I have worked together as a mother-daughter team, providing placenta encapsulation services in western Colorado. It’s a deeply beautiful feeling, using our mother-daughter relationship to support other women’s journeys into motherhood.

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Scribonia Attica: A Second-century Roman Midwife

Midwifery Today, Issue 133, Spring 2020. Join Midwifery Today Online Membership Sometimes the history of midwifery is hidden in a tomb. This statement is not a metaphor for lost history; it’s reality. In the Isola Sacra necropolis in Ostia, a seaport of ancient Rome (originally situated at the mouth of the Tiber River but today located about four miles upstream) in Italy, lies the tomb of Scribonia Attica, a second-century Roman midwife. Her funeral monument is striking because it depicts the midwife herself, squatting on a low stool in front of a naked pregnant woman who is seated in a chair and supported by another woman from behind. The midwife looks out directly at the viewer of her memorial, while her right hand reaches between the laboring woman’s legs, perhaps to check the woman’s progress or to deliver her baby. The name of this midwife, Scribonia Attica, reveals a little bit about her. She shared her first name with the Scribonia family of ancient Rome as well as two famous women: the wife of Octavian, later the Emperor Augustus, who ruled during the first century CE (when Jesus was born); and the wife of Crassus, who was a first century… Read more…. Scribonia Attica: A Second-century Roman Midwife

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The Third Stage of Labor

The third stage of labor is the period following expulsion of the baby (second stage) via the birth canal. It usually takes approximately 5–30 minutes until the placenta and membranes are expelled. After this, lochia and lactation commence.

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The Future of Lullabies

This is an obligatory topic for students of human nature who understand Homo as a primate endowed of the capacity to develop sophisticated ways to communicate.… Read more…. The Future of Lullabies

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